Facts, Studies & Statistics
  • “Some smaller telecom providers in Tennessee are charging intrastate access rates which are at least three times higher than their interstate access charges.Access charges are a vestige of the monopoly era, in which carriers could easily shift costs because they were protected from competition.  The telecommunications market is now one of the most competitive arenas in the global economy.  And legacy voice network traffic has declined by half.   The intrastate access revenues traditionally required to generate cross-subsidies for local phone service are rapidly declining.  The system is imploding.” March, 2011 http://citizensforadigitalfuture.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Hance-TN-Paper.pdf)
  • “Broadband is already contributing to greater energy efficiency. Broadband applications will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than a billion tons by 2018.” (Eisenach, PhD. Jeffrey. The Telecom Sector and the Economy, How U.S. Broadband Policies are Working for America. Washington DC: Empiris, LLC). September, 2008. http://www.empiris.com/docs/Telecom%20and%20the%20Economy%20September%202008.pdf)
  • “For every one percentage point increase in broadband penetration in a state, employment is projected to increase by 0.2 to 0.3 percent per year. For the entire U.S. private non-farm economy, this suggests an increase of about 300,000 jobs, assuming the economy is not already at “full employment” (the national unemployment rate being as low as it can be with a low, stable rate of inflation).” (Crandall, Robert, William Lehr and Robert Litan. The Effects of Broadband Deployment on Output and Employment: A Cross-sectional Analysis of U.S. Data. (Washington DC: The Brookings Institution). July, 2007. http://www3.brookings.edu/views/papers/crandall/200706litan.pdf)
  • “States have few policy levers that affect the overall demand for broadband.17 However, given that the demand for broadband is price elastic, the most effective policies are likely to be those that contribute to lower prices.18 The surest route to lower prices is provided by increasing competition in the delivery of broadband services.” (Crandall, Robert, William Lehr and Robert Litan. The Effects of Broadband Deployment on Output and Employment: A Cross-sectional Analysis of U.S. Data. (Washington DC: The Brookings Institution). July, 2007. http://www3.brookings.edu/views/papers/crandall/200706litan.pdf)
  • “Indeed, we believe widespread implementation of telehealth could save the U.S. health care system $4.28 billion just from reducing transfers of patients from one location, such as a nursing home, for medical exams at hospitals, physicians’ offices, or other caregiver locations.” (Vo, Alexander H. The Telehealth Promise, Better Health Care and Cost Savings for the 21st Century. A joint project with University of Texas Medical Branch, AT&T Center for Telehealth Research and Policy, and Electronic Health Network, (Galveston, TX: University of Texas Medical Branch). May, 2008. http://ehealthvirginia.org/downloads/20080529/UTMB%20Telemedicine%20White%20Paper%2019May2008.pdf)
  • “77% of the home internet users – or 55% of all Americans – have high speed access via cable modem, DSL, a wireless connection, a satellite link or some other way.” (Estabrook, Leigh, Evans Witt and Lee Rainie. Information searches that solve problems, How people use the internet, libraries and government agencies when they need help. Part of Pew Internet & American Life Project, and a joint paper with Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (Washington DC: Pew Research). December 30, 2007. http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/Pew_UI_LibrariesReport.pdf)
  • “Internet users are much more likely to contact the government than non-users, whether or not they actually used the internet to make that contact. Two-thirds of internet users (65%) say they have contacted the government in the past year, compared with 36% of those who do not use the internet.” (Estabrook, Leigh, Evans Witt and Lee Rainie. Information searches that solve problems, How people use the internet, libraries and government agencies when they need help. Part of Pew Internet & American Life Project, and a joint paper with Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (Washington DC: Pew Research). December 30, 2007. http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/Pew_UI_LibrariesReport.pdf)
  • “For assistance on educational matters, 77% of respondents identifying this problem used the internet to deal with it;” (Estabrook, Leigh, Evans Witt and Lee Rainie. Information searches that solve problems, How people use the internet, libraries and government agencies when they need help. Part of Pew Internet & American Life Project, and a joint paper with Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (Washington DC: Pew Research). December 30, 2007. http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/Pew_UI_LibrariesReport.pdf)
  • “The OECD estimated about 66 million wireline broadband connections in the U.S. in June 2007.” (Wallsten, Scott. Understanding International Broadband Comparisons. (Washington DC: Technology Policy Institute). May, 2008. http://www.techpolicyinstitute.org/news/show/23052.html)
  • “Consumer demand (have or want broadband) for broadband is relatively high at 71%, while they other 29% have no intention based on: not interested in anything on the internet (13%), not sure how to use the internet (5%), have internet access at work (4%), can’t afford computer (4%), I can’t afford service (2%), and not available for my home (1%).” (Wallsten, Scott. Understanding International Broadband Comparisons. (Washington DC: Technology Policy Institute). May, 2008. http://www.techpolicyinstitute.org/news/show/23052.html)
  • “The U.S. leads the OECD in information and communications technology (ICT) investments.” (Wallsten, Scott. Understanding International Broadband Comparisons. (Washington DC: Technology Policy Institute). May, 2008. http://www.techpolicyinstitute.org/news/show/23052.html)
  • “Penetration of high-speed Internet, otherwise known as broadband, among those in rural areas is almost identical to penetration of broadband among those with total household incomes under $30,000.” (Horrigan and Smith 2007).( Peha, Jon M. Bringing Broadband to Unserved Communities. Part of The Hamilton Project, Advancing Opportunity, Prosperity and Growth. (Washington DC: The Brookings Institution). May, 2008. http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/papers/2008/07_broadband_peha/07_broadband_peha.pdf)
  • “The overall percentage of Americans using the Internet at any speed, a figure that has grown by almost a factor of five from 1995 to 2007, is currently holding steady at more than 70 percent. The majority of Internet users want access from home. Increasingly, they also want broadband.” (Peha, Jon M. Bringing Broadband to Unserved Communities. Part of The Hamilton Project, Advancing Opportunity, Prosperity and Growth. (Washington DC: The Brookings Institution). May, 2008. http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/papers/2008/07_broadband_peha/07_broadband_peha.pdf)
  • “Many new telephone competitors, often using wireless technology, now receive USF subsidies to serve rural areas. Indeed, subsidies for these new competitors have grown from negligible in 2002 to more than $1 billion in 2006 (Martin 2007a, 2007b), whereas the subsidies flowing to existing wireline providers have remained roughly constant at around $3 billion per year (Martin 2007a, 2007b).” (Peha, Jon M. Bringing Broadband to Unserved Communities. Part of The Hamilton Project, Advancing Opportunity, Prosperity and Growth. (Washington DC: The Brookings Institution). May, 2008. http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/papers/2008/07_broadband_peha/07_broadband_peha.pdf)
  • “From March 2006 to March 2007, home broadband adoption grew from 42% of Americans to 47%. (Horrigan, John B. Home Broadband Adoption 2008. Part of Pew Internet & American Life Project.” (Washington DC: Pew Research). May, 2008. http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Broadband_2008.pdf)
  • “With growth in broadband at home, now just 10% of Americans have dial-up internet connections at home.” (Horrigan, John B. Home Broadband Adoption 2008. Part of Pew Internet & American Life Project. (Washington DC: Pew Research). May, 2008. http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Broadband_2008.pdf)
  • “38% of those living in rural American now have broadband at home, compared with 31% who said this in 2007, or a growth rate of 23% from 2007 to 2008. By comparison, 57% of urban residents have high-speed connections at home now and 60% of suburban residents have such connections.” (Horrigan, John B. Home Broadband Adoption 2008. Part of Pew Internet & American Life Project. (Washington DC: Pew Research). May, 2008. http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Broadband_2008.pdf)
  • “When asked what they like most about having a broadband connection, 75% of home high-speed users cited faster access or greater speed. Other uses cited as the feature valued most included the “always on”’ connection (cited by 6% of broadband users), convenience (5%), job-related tasks (4%),downloading files of all types (3%), and finding educational materials (2%).” (Horrigan, John B. Home Broadband Adoption 2008. Part of Pew Internet & American Life Project. (Washington DC: Pew Research). May, 2008. http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Broadband_2008.pdf)
  • “Respondents in focus groups were asked how they would prioritize their communications bills between cell phones, landline phones, cable TV and Internet. 99% named their cell phone bill as the top priority and 95% chose broadband second.” (Bryne, Amelia, Jaewon Chung, Dharma Dailey, Joe Karaganis, and Alison Powell. Broadband Adoption in Low-Income Communities. Social Science Research Council. 2 Mar. 2010. http://webarchive.ssrc.org/broadband_adoption.pdf)
  • 22% of respondents in the study were un-adopters, opting out of Internet access. They generally cited five reasons for their lack of adoption: bundling of services, quality-of-service issues, billing issues, technical issues and financial challenges. (Bryne, Amelia, Jaewon Chung, Dharma Dailey, Joe Karaganis, and Alison Powell. Broadband Adoption in Low-Income Communities. Social Science Research Council. 2 Mar. 2010. http://webarchive.ssrc.org/broadband_adoption.pdf)
  • 99% of non-adopter respondents surveyed described cost as a barrier to broadband access. (Bryne, Amelia, Jaewon Chung, Dharma Dailey, Joe Karaganis, and Alison Powell. Broadband Adoption in Low-Income Communities. Social Science Research Council. 2 Mar. 2010. http://webarchive.ssrc.org/broadband_adoption.pdf)
  • 71% of libraries surveyed reported that they are the only source of free access to computers and Internet in their communities. In fact, The Albuquerque, New Mexico library system has recorded a 148% increase in computer sessions since 2004. (Bryne, Amelia, Jaewon Chung, Dharma Dailey, Joe Karaganis, and Alison Powell. Broadband Adoption in Low-Income Communities. Social Science Research Council. 2 Mar. 2010. http://webarchive.ssrc.org/broadband_adoption.pdf)
  • “In 2006, the wide-spread availability of broadband added over 1% to the employment growth rate in a typical community.” (William Lehr, Carlos Osorio, Sharon Gillett and Marvin A. Sirbu “Measuring Broadband Economic Impact,” Paper presented at the 33rd Research Conference on Communications, Information and Internet Policy. Arlington, Va. September 23-25, 2006 http://www.eda.gov/PDF/2006%20Measuring%20Broadband%20Report.pdf)
  • “In an underemployed economy, for every one percentage point increase in broadband penetration in a state of the USA, employment is projected to increase by 0.2 to 0.3 percent a year.” (Robert Crandall, William Lehr and Robert Litan, “The Effects of Broadband Deployment on Output and Employment: A Cross-sectional Analysis of U.S. Data,” Working Paper, Brookings Institution, 2007 http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/papers/2007/06labor_crandall/06labor_crandall.pdf)
  • 91% of African Americans earning more than $50,000 regularly use the Internet, as compared to 89% of Hispanics earning the same amount. More than 75% each of African Americans and Hispanics earning between $20,000 and $50,000 also report regular use of the Internet. (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • 98% of Hispanics and 94% of African Americans with a college education report regular Internet use and over 80% of respondents. (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • 82% of Hispanics and 79% of African Americans earning more than $50,000 reported a home broadband connection. Additionally, more than 60% of African Americans and Hispanics households with annual incomes between $20,000 and $50,000 reported having a home-based broadband connection. (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • 87% of Hispanics and 82% of African Americans earning more than $50,000 reported using the Internet to search for health or medical information. (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • 79% of African American respondents and 77% of Hispanics earning more than $50,000 reported visiting local, city, state, and federal web sites to find relevant information. (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • 18% of White Americans reported that they have been online for 1-5 years, as compared to 28% of African Americans and 35% of Hispanics. (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • More White Americans have been using the Internet for more than 10 years (35%) followed by 28% of African Americans, and 22% of Hispanics. (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • 23% of African Americans and 21% of Hispanics 65 years of age and older regularly use the Internet. Of these users, 17% of Hispanics and 15% of African Americans have a home broadband connection. (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • Hispanics earning less than $20,000 have much lower Internet adoption rates than their African American and White American counterparts. At 47%, Hispanics in general have the lowest rate of home-based broadband. In fact, only 31% of Hispanics earning less than $20,000 have a home broadband connection.(Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • “More than a quarter of African Americans with less than a high school diploma enjoy home broadband. Hispanics, at 22%, had the lowest percentage of individuals polled without home broadband access.” (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • Among families with an annual income of less than $20,000, 92% of African Americans and 63% of Hispanics reported going online for job searches. Comparatively, only 54% of Whites with a similar socio-economic standing use the internet for job searching. (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • “Education is a strong indicator of Internet usage. A 2010 study on Internet usage in minority communities found that among respondents without a high school diploma, 77% of African Americans, 64% of Hispanics, and 17% of Whites go online to search for job information. Similarly, 79% of African Americans and 67% of Hispanics with only a high school diploma go online to search for job information, compared 35% of Whites.” (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • In 2010, 90% of Internet users surveyed reported their home as the primary location where they use the Internet. (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • 68% of African American Internet users and 67% of their Hispanic counterparts reported visiting the homes of other people to access the Internet. (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • 70% of non-Internet users reported that they did not know of any broadband providers in their community. (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • 50% of African Americans and 42% of Hispanics reported using their cell phone to access the Internet. (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • 33% of broadband non-users were interested in subscribing to a broadband connection. Of those considering adoption, 31% cited cost as the major barrier and 17% indicated that broadband was not available in their neighborhoods. (Gant, Jon P., PhD, Nicol E. Turner-Lee, PhD, Ying Li, PhD, Joseph S. Miller, ESQ. National Minority Broadband Adoption: Comparative Trends in Adoption, Acceptance and Use. The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 25 Feb. 2010. http://www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/MTI_BROADBAND_REPORT_2.pdf)
  • In the next year, assuming that no regulation is passed to undermine investment incentives, it is predicted that the telecom industry will invest $30.4 billion broadband technologies, creating over 509,000 American jobs. (Crandall, Robert W. and Hal J. Singer. The Economic Impact of Broadband Investment. Broadband for America. 23 Feb. 2010. http://www.ncta.com/DocumentBinary.aspx?id=880)
  • In 2008, the telemedicine industry is expected to grow by $6 billion per year by 2012, up from $900 million in 2007. (Crandall, Robert W. and Hal J. Singer. The Economic Impact of Broadband Investment. Broadband for America. 23 Feb. 2010. http://www.ncta.com/DocumentBinary.aspx?id=880)
  • Over time, the number of jobs triggered by added Cap Ex would approach 1.2 million, specifically 546,000 jobs directly and indirectly from network deployment and 665,000 jobs generated in other parts of the economy owing to externality effects. (Darby, Larry F., and Joseph P. Fuhr. and Stephen B. Pociask, The Internet Ecosystem: Employment Impacts of National Broadband Policy. The American Consumer Institute Center for Citizen Research. 28 Jan. 2010. http://www.theamericanconsumer.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/aci-jobs-study-final1.pdf)
  • “The level of adoption of broadband in the United States remains relatively low. While between 92 to 94 percent of U.S. households can subscribe to broadband (i.e. their residences are served by fixed broadband other than satellite), only ap­proximately 65 percent subscribe.” (Atkinson, Robert. Policies to Increase Broadband Adoption at Home. The Information Technology & Innovation Foundation. 9 Nov. 2009. http://www.itif.org/files/2009-demand-side-policies.pdf)
  • “The Economist recently noted the importance of broadband for both developing and developed economies, reporting that a 10 percentage point increase in broadband penetration would increase GDP by about 1.2% in developed economies. [“A Special Report on Telecoms in Emerging Markets,” the ECONOMIST, Sept 26, 2009, at 5.] (Bazelon, Coleman, The Need for Additional Spectrum for Wireless Broadband: The Economic Benefits and Costs of Reallocations. The Brattle Group. 23 Oct. 2010. http://www.brattle.com/_documents/uploadlibrary/upload809.pdf)
  • Concludes: “Up to $62 billion of spectrum could be made available for the cost of $9 billion to $12 billion. Such as significant mismatch between value and cost indicates radio spectrum is currently inefficiently allocated. Moreover, consumer benefits from the wireless sector would likely be between $500 billion and $1.2 trillion. These additional benefits represent both cost savings and increased usage to consumers for existing services and new services that can only be developed and offered in a more spectrum abundant marketplace.” (Bazelon, Coleman, The Need for Additional Spectrum for Wireless Broadband: The Economic Benefits and Costs of Reallocations. The Brattle Group. 23 Oct. 2010. http://www.brattle.com/_documents/uploadlibrary/upload809.pdf)
  • Ubiquitous broadband deployment will create an additional 1.2 million jobs from infrastructure spending. (Crandall, Robert W. and Hal J. Singer, The Effect of Ubiquitous Broadband Adoption on Investment, Jobs, and the U.S. Economy. Criterion Economics, LLC, New Millennium Research. Sept. 2003. http://www.newmillenniumresearch.org/archive/bbstudyreport_091703.pdf)
  • Overall demand for mobile data is estimated to grow at an annual rate of 125% over the next few years and at rates 100 times greater than voice traffic will grow over the next decade. (“Mobile broadband Spectrum Demand,” Rysavvy Research, December 20008, at 12 as quoted in Bazelon, Coleman, The Need for Additional Spectrum for Wireless Broadband: The Economic Benefits and Costs of Reallocations. The Brattle Group. 23 Oct. 2010. http://www.brattle.com/_documents/uploadlibrary/upload809.pdf)